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About Columbus State University

Inclusion Survey Results

During a 2016 meeting that included CSU President Chris Markwood and the Diversity Services & Programs Advisory Committee, the president proposed administering a survey to evaluate the climate of the university to help develop strategies and priorities for the future.

After consulting with other universities, CSU hired Snyder Remarks, who had worked with Georgia Tech and Georgia College in a similar format for a climate assessment.

During the spring 2017 semester, the University moved forward with the survey to enhance campus culture, incorporating attention to diversity sensitivity and freedom of expression in every area of the university.

The project included:

  • Preparatory consultation and engagement with CSU leadership and the Institutional Diversity & Inclusion Committee.
  • Implementing, facilitating and documenting campus-wide conversations in focus group format/confidential individual interviews.
  • Development, implementation and assessment of a survey. Managed off-campus for confidentiality, the survey was emailed to all faculty, staff and students. Multiple reminders were sent by email, and awareness of the survey was built through a variety of public relations efforts.
    • A total of 1,683 people responded to the survey. Response rates were:
      • Students - 12.7%
      • Staff - 51.54%
      • Faculty - 42.37%

Of those who responded:

  • 101 were graduate students
  • 967 were undergraduate students
  • 368 were staff members
  • 247 were faculty members

Of the faculty who responded, they self-identified as:

  • 67.7% - White
  • 9.7% - Black
  • 6.9% - Asian
  • 5.2% - Not listed
  • 4% - Hispanic
  • 4% -Not Reported
  • 2.4% - American-Indian or Alaskan Native

Of the staff who responded, they self-identified as:

  • 66.7% - White
  • 17.1% Not Reported
  • 3.8% - Hispanic
  • 2.4% - Black
  • 2.7% - Asian
  • 4.3% - Not listed
  • 1.9% - American-Indian or Alaskan Native
  • 1.1% Pacific Islander

Of the graduate students who responded, they self-identified as:

  • 40.7% - White
  • 38% - Black
  • 12% - Asian
  • 2.8% - Not listed
  • 2.8% - Not Reported
  • 1.9% - Hispanic
  • .9% - American-Indian or Alaskan Native
  • .9% - Pacific Islander

Of the undergraduate students who responded, they self-identified as:

  • 42.1% - Black
  • 37.3% - White
  • 6.2% - Hispanic
  • 4.4% - Asian
  • 3.6% - Not listed
  • 2.8% - American-Indian or Alaskan Native
  • 2.4% - Not reported
  • 1.2% - Pacific Islander

Here is what the survey revealed from those who responded:

  • Most believe that CSU has demonstrated an appreciation for diversity.
  • Students, faculty and staff appreciated the process of learning more about inclusion, want to learn more about these issues and are open to more discussion and change.
    • A clear desire was expressed to have more, and regular, conversation like those that were a part of the survey process.
  • Staff want to learn more about how to be respectful and deal with different types of people.
  • Respondents expressed a desire for more transparent and clear communication about inclusiveness and diversity.
  • Staff and faculty need to know more about how to report issues that appear to contradict our value of inclusion.
  • Hiring, training, policy and discipline issues need to be reviewed to ensure they are in line with our value of inclusion and our intolerance for discrimination.
  • Staff overwhelmingly (72%) feel CSU regularly discusses diversity.
  • A majority of faculty (64%), staff (63%) and undergraduate students (63%) feel valued at CSU.
  • Staff (63%) believe CSU is concerned about their welfare.
  • About 19% of all respondents reported experiencing derogatory remarks or gestures.
  • About 22% faculty reported seeing behavior they thought could be characterized as discrimination; same for 19% of staff, 16% of undergraduate students and 14% of graduate students.
  • 20% of staff respondents and 31% of faculty respondents think racism is a problem.
  • 22% of faculty, and 16% of staff see discrimination due to gender as a problem.
  • About 16 percent of faculty and 13% of staff reported not feeling comfortable expressing their own views on campus regarding sexual orientation or gender identity.
  • 29% of staff want to learn how to anonymously report inappropriate behavior.
  • In terms of communication on campus, 71% of staff think that administration-faculty communication is good, 71% of faculty think CSU holds the value of being open, but 25% of students do not feel free to express their opinions, and 23% of staff reported that CSU does not value their opinion.
  • 86% of employees feel CSU values the freedom to discuss various points of view.