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Bibb Manufacturing CompanyRecords (MC 211) - Columbus State University

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Bibb Manufacturing CompanyRecords (MC 211)

Organizational Note

This following information is taken from the Bibb Manufacturing Company article written by Arden Williams of the Georgia Humanities Council and published in 2006 in the on-line New Georgia Encyclopedia. For the full article, accompanying photos and suggested further readings, click here: New Georgia Encyclopedia . Bibb Manufacturing Company, an important part of Georgia's cotton and textile industry for more than a century, became one of the state's largest employers by the mid-1950s before its decline and sale in 1998.

Early History

Bibb Manufacturing Company, known for its quality textile products, originated in Macon in 1876. Named for Bibb County, the enterprise was initiated in 1876 by three cotton merchants, Hugh Moss Comer of Savannah and brothers Major John F. Hanson and I. Newton Hanson of Macon.

The merchants set up their first factory for yarn production in a freight warehouse formerly used by the Central of Georgia Railway. Comer served as president and Major Hanson as secretary and treasurer. In 1878 they acquired their second mill by purchasing a former cotton factory, Macon Manufacturing Company.

Company Growth

By 1895 the Bibb Manufacturing Company employed 700 workers and consumed 20,000 bales of cotton annually. By 1898 it had acquired additional Georgia mills: Macon Knitting Company, Taylor Manufacturing near Reynolds, the Cordele Manufacturing Company, and two already established mills at Porterdale.

In 1900 Comer died, and Major Hanson succeeded him as president. That year Bibb Manufacturing purchased a dam site on the Chattahoochee River near Columbus from the Columbus Power Company. A new mill was built called the Columbus Mill; the surrounding community was named "Bibb City." In time this facility would become the largest cotton mill in the country. Another new factory opened in 1905, the Payne Mill, located in Vineville. It would be the last outside acquisition made by Bibb Manufacturing for thirty-two years. Hanson served as president until 1908. During his years with Bibb, he was also named head of both the Central of Georgia Railway and the Ocean Steamship Company.

Major Hanson was succeeded by G. Gunby Jordan of Columbus. By 1911 Bibb Manufacturing advertised itself as "one of the largest and most important enterprises in the South." At that point Bibb owned nine factories in Georgia, four of which were located in Macon. E. T. Comer, the younger brother of Hugh Comer, took over as president in 1913 and remained in the position through World War I (1917-18). Three years later, in 1916, Bibb expanded further by building the Osprey Mill in Porterdale.

Mill Communities

As the company grew, so did the surrounding mill communities. Bibb provided company housing, churches, and schools; other structures included swimming pools, auditoriums, and gymnasiums. By the 1920s each of the Bibb communities also had an on-site social worker who implemented clubs, athletic programs, and medical care.

America's involvement in World War I proved profitable for the company. In 1919 William D. Anderson, who had started at Bibb Manufacturing as a salesman in 1898, became president. He remained in charge for the next twenty-eight years.

Depression Era

Like mills all over the South, Bibb experienced problems and worker unrest with the onset of the Great Depression. In 1934 there was a general textile strike that involved thousands of workers. At the time Anderson was also president of the American Cotton Manufacturer's Association, which supported mill owners. But he also felt a responsibility to his loyal employees. Anderson called in the National Guard to stand watch over Bibb mills during the strike. This action locked out strikers and kept the mills from unionizing.

In 1937 Bibb acquired another Columbus mill, the Meritas Mill, and renamed it the Anderson Mill. During World War II (1941-45) the company was the largest war-industry producer in Georgia. William Anderson retired in 1947, but Bibb continued to grow under his successor, Charles Hertwig. In the next decades the company acquired more mills in Georgia, including the Forsyth Mill, the Bellvue Mill (Macon), the Arnall and Arnco mills in Coweta County, Plant Camilla near Juliett, Plant Laurel near Potterville, and two additional plants in Monroe County. By 1966 Bibb had fourteen mills in operation.

Later Years

In 1956 Robert Train, grandson of Hugh Comer, was appointed president. By this time textile mills all over the South were faltering. Bibb had acquired additional factories in other states but began to sell its company housing in the 1960s. By 1970, when William S. Manning became president, some of the factories were put up for sale. The succeeding decades saw more closures for Bibb. In 1996, under CEO Michael Fulbright, the Bibb Companies went through bankruptcy reorganization. Unable to recover economically, the company was sold in 1998 to the Dan River Corporation of Virginia.

The mill communities, especially Bibb City, were affected by the closures. In 2000 Bibb City ceased to be an independent community, merging with the city of Columbus.

Through its many products, employees, and mill communities, Bibb, known as "the first name in textiles," helped to shape Georgia during its many years of operation in the state.

Scope and Content

The collection includes 4 boxes of administrative records, including technical information on processes and products, patent information, correspondence, stock control records, and other matters. The remaining 120 boxes are receipts for goods and services from 1916-1948. 1910s-1940s 128 l.f.

Permission to Publish

Permission to publish material from the Bibb Manufacturing Company Records must be obtained from the Columbus State University Archives at Columbus State University. Use of the following credit line for publication or exhibit is required: Bibb Manufacturing Company Records (MC 211) Columbus State University Archives Columbus, Georgia

Provenance

This collection was donated to the CSU Archives by Neel Hamilton in November of 2005.

Note to Researchers

This collection is semi-processed. The receipts are sorted by year only. See Also: Bibb Manufacturing Company Booklets (SMC 82)

Box List

Series 1: Correspondence and Administrative Documents

Box 1

  • Folder 1 - AATCC Research Committee on Soiling of Carpets - Minutes, May 4, 1961 This folder contains:Minutes of the May 4, 1961 Meeting of the Committee & Correspondence
  • Folder 2 - Advertisement for Bibb Manufacturing Co., Macon, Georgia
  • Folder 3 - American Society for Testing Materials, 1950s, 1960s This folder contains:Correspondence & Minutes
  • Folder 4 - The Analytical Method of Battery Tending, Anderson Plant, Columbus, GA
    • This folder contains:
      • Course Outline - Job Conditions - Skills Analysis - General Exercises - Basic - Combined Exercises - Quality Exercises - Production Exercises - Stamina Development - 21 Points
  • Folder 5 - The Analytical Method of Training, 1967 This folder contains:
    • Part I: Introduction to A.M. Training: A: Characteristics of Skilled Performance, B: Learning Industrial Skills, C: Traditional Learning Problems and A.M. Solutions - Part II: A: Operation analysis, B: Quality Specification, C: Fault Analysis, D: Basic Skill Development, E: Production Skill Development, F: Stamina Build-Up, G: Outline of Training Course, H: Targets, I: Talks, J: Programming, K: Records, L: Transfer to Production Department - Part III: Re-Training, A: The Problem - Part IV: Administration of A.M. Program: A: Control of Progress, B: Participation by Production Supervisors, C: Selecting Training Instructors, D: Notes on Selection Tests
  • Folder 6 - Annual Labor Turnover Report of All Mills, 1951/1952
    • This folder contains:
      • I: Summary of All Mills - II: Columbus Mill - III: Anderson Mill - IV: Porterdale Mills: 1: Osprey Mill, 2: Porterdale Mill, 3: Welaunee Mill, 4: General Miscellaneous - V: Macon Mills: 1: No. One Mill, 2: No. One Outside, 3: No. Two Mill, 4: Crown Mill, 5: Star Mill, 6: Payne Mill, 7: Taylor Mill
  • Folder 7 - Arnold Hoffman & Co. Incorporated (Subsidiary of Imperial Chemical Industries Limited - England), 1961
  • Folder 8 - Correspondence, 1957
  • Folder 9 - Correspondence, 1958
  • Folder 10 - Correspondence, 1959
  • Folder 11 - Correspondence, 1960
  • Folder 12 - Correspondence, 1961
  • Folder 13 - Correspondence, 1962
  • Folder 14 - Correspondence, 1963
  • Folder 15 - Correspondence, 1964
  • Folder 16 - Correspondence about the "Verve" Type Fabric, 1962
  • Folder 17 - Cotton Fiber and Processing Test Results Crop, 1960, 61, 62
  • Folder 18 - Cotton Removed from Warehouse Shipment, 1950s, 1960
  • Folder 19 - Cotton Report (Monthly)
    • This folder contains:
      • Report for: July 15, 1960 - August 12, 1960 - September 13, 1960 - October 21, 1960 - November 18, 1960 - December 15, 1960 - January 19, 1961 - February 21, 1961 - March 15, 1961 - April 12, 1961 - June 17, 1961 - July 10, 1961 - August 10, 1961 - September 8, 1961 - October 9, 1961 - November 15, 1961 - February 6, 1962 - March 14, 1962 - April 6, 1962 - May 14, 1962 - June 11, 1962 - August 6, 1962
  • Folder 20 - Generic Terms & Products in the Textile Industry
  • Folder 21 - Industrial Products
  • Folder 22 - Job Standards, 1936
  • Folder 23 - Macon's Overseers' Organization, March 1929
  • Folder 24 - Magnified Picture of Yarn
  • Folder 25 - Miscellaneous This folder contains:Correspondence - Handwritten Notes - Freight Settlement, 1924 - Patent Lists
  • Folder 26 - Patents: 1874, 1917, 1927, 1931, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1938, 1939, 1940
    • This folder contains:
      • Patent # 152, 903 – 152,903: Improvement in Treating Textile Fabrics to Prevent Mildew and Decay
      • Patented June 5 1917 – 1,228,458: Isaac S. McGiehan, of New York - Process of Impregnating Fabrics with Rubber
      • Patented April, 4, 1922 – 1,411,786: Ernest Hopkinson of New York - Process of Treating Fibrous Material and Product
      • Patented Nov. 1, 1927 – 1,647,435: John H. Clewell, Jr., of Arlington, New Jersey - Actinismproof Cellulose-Ester Composition
      • Patented April 21, 1925 – 1,534,676: George Edward Andrew of Northwood, England - Manufacture of Tape Cord, Yarn, Rope, Fabric, or Other Material Produced from Fibers
      • Patented March 24, 1931 – 1,797,249: Reginald Truesdale, Robert Smith, and Edward Simpson, of Erdington, Birmingham, England, Assignors to the Dunlop Rubber Company, Limited, of Fort Dunlop, England, a Corporation of Great Britain – Apparatus for the Manufacture of Cords or Strings
      • Patented December 29, 1931 – 1,839,168: Gerhard Karl Emil  Heinrich Stampe, of Luebeck, Germany, Assignor to Otto Heinrich Drager, of Luebeck, Germany – Fabric for Gas Protection Mask or the Like and Method for Producing Same
      • Patented February 13, 1934 – 1,947,024: Edgar A. Slage, Cranford, N.J., Assignor to American Smelting and Refining Company, New York, N.Y., a Corporation of New Jersey – Chemical Treatment of Fabrics
      • Patented June 26, 1934 – 1,964,658: Jean Etienne Charles Bongrand, Paris, and Leon Sylvain Max Lejeune, Wasquehal, France – Manufacture of Threads of Textile Material
      • Patented September 4, 1934: George W. Danielson, Fall River, Mass., Assignor to the Firestone Tire & Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio – Strand Coating Device
      • Patented September 25, 1934: Juan Duarry-Serra, Barcelona, Spain – Process for Impregnating Textile Products with Latex under Great Hydraulic Pressures
      • Patented January 8, 1935: Ralph M. Reel, Newark, Ohio, Assignor to the Pharis Tire and Rubber Company, Newark, Ohio – Pneumatic Tire Construction
      • Patented February, 26, 1935: Eardley Hazell, New York, N.Y., Assignor, by Mesne Assignments, to United States Rubber Company – Rubber-Fabric Material
      • Patented June 18, 1935: Philip Schidrowitz, London, England, Assignor by Mesne Assignments, to Filastic Holding S.A., Binningen, near Basel, Switzerland – Impregnation of Textile Materials
      • Patented December 29, 1936 – Improvement in the Treatment of Fabrics for the Production of Non-Crease Effects
      • Patented December 31, 1935: George Henry Rhodes, Fall River, Mass. – Process of Treating Textile Fabrics
      • Patented March 31, 1936: Ralph W. Brown, Belleville III, Assignor to Aluminum Company of America, Pittsburgh, Pa. – Treatment of Fabrics
      • Patented August 4, 1936: Lorin B. Sebrell, Silver Lake, Ohio, Assignor to Wingfoot Corporation, Wilmington, Delaware – Prevention of Deterioration of Cotton Cord by Heat
      • Patented August 4, 1936: Lorin B. Sebrell, Silver Lake, Ohio, Assignor to Wingfoot Corporation, Wilmington, Delaware – Prevention of Deterioration of Cotton Cord by Heat
      • Patented may 31, 1938: Dalton B. Faloon, Beacon, and Roland M. Whittaker, New York, N.Y., Assignors to Hammond Paint & Chemical Co. – Process for Protecting Material Employing Pestproofing media and Material so protected (2 Copies)
      • Patented August 23, 1938: Joseph Brandwood, Southport, England – Process for Treatment of Textile Materials
      • Patented December 31, 1938: Samuel C. Horning, Newark, N.J., Assignor to E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company, Willmongton, Delaware – Lead Chromate Pigments and Process for Producing the Same
      • Patented August 30, 1938: William Hale Charch, Buffalo, N.Y., and Dorothy Bateman Maney, Old Hickory, Tenn., Assignors by Mesne Assignments, to E.I. du Pont Nemours & Company, Wilmington, Delaware – Treatment of Cellulosic Materials and Products Resulting There From
      • Patented November 22, 1938: Eugene C. Gwaltney, Macon, Georgia, Assignor to Bibb Manufacturing Company, Macon, GA – Process of Manufacturing Rubber Impregnated Fabric and the Product Thereof
      • Patented February 14, 1939: Samuel Katzoff, Hampton, Va., and Reuben Roseman, Baltimore, Md. – Solution of Titanic Hydroxide in Hydrogen Peroxide
      • Patented March 12, 1940: Otto Kress and Charles E. Johnson, Appleton, Wis., Assignors to the Institute of Paper Chemistry, Appleton, Wis. – Proteinized Hosiery
      • Patented March 25, 1941: Fernand Frederic Schwartz, Paris, France, Assignor, by Direct and Mesne Assignments, to American Ecla Corporation, Dover, Delaware – Waterproofing of Textile Material
      • Patented June 18, 1940: Samuel Lenher and Luther B. Arnold, Jr., Wilmington, Del., Assignors to E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company, Wilmington, Delaware – Softening of Textile Materials and Compositions Thereof
      • Patented August 20, 1940: Arthur P. Tanberg, Wilmington, Del., Assignor, by Mesne Assignments, to E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company, Wilmington, Delaware – Artificial Cellulosic material Bonded to rubber and Method of Producing the Bond
      • Patented August 20, 1940: Frederick M. Meigs, Wilmington, Del., Assignor by Mesne Assignments, to E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company, Wilmington, Delaware – Artificial Cellulosic Material Bonded to Rubber and Method of Producing the Bond
      • Patented August 20, 1940: Dorothy Bateman Maney, Old Hickory, Tenn., Assignor, by Mesne Assignments, to E.I.  Du Pont de Nemours & Company, Wilmington, Delaware – Artificial Cellulosic Material Bonded to Rubber and Method of Producing the Bond
      • Patented August 20, 1940: Albert Hershberger, Kenmore, N.Y., Assignor, by Mesne Assignments, to E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company, Wilmington, Delaware – Artificial Cellulosic Material Bonded to Rubber and Method of Producing the Bond
      • Patented August 20, 1940: Albert Hershberger, Kenmore, N.Y., Assignor, by Mesne Assignments, to E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company, Wilmington, Delaware – Artificial Cellulosic Material Bonded to Rubber and Method of Producing the Bond – Also: Patented Aug. 20, 1040 # 2,211 949, # 2,211,948, 2,211, 945
      • Patented August 20, 1940: Emmette F. Izard, Kenmore, N.Y., Assignor to E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company, Wilmington, Delaware – Cellulosic Product and Process for Preparing Same
      • Patented August 30, 1938: William Hale Charch, Buffalo, N.Y., and Dorothy Bateman Maney, Old Hickory, Tenn., Assignors, by Mesne Assignments, to E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company, Wilmington, Delaware – Treatment of Cellulosic Materials and Products Resulting Therefrom
      • Patented October 8, 1940: Peter M. Strang, Auburndale, and Austin S. Norcross, Newton, Mass., Assignors, by Mesne Assignments, to Peter M. Strang – Method of and Apparatus for Testing Fibrous Textile Materials
      • Patented October 8, 1940: Herald M. Ruch, Los Angeles, California – Tire Cord Demonstration Device
      • Patented October 15, 1940: Clifford J.B. Thor, Chicago, Ill., Assignor to the Visking Corporation, Chicago, Ill. – Process for Producing Articles of Regenerated Chitin and the Resulting Articles
      • Patented October 15, 1940: Henry Dreyfus, London, England – Manufacture of Esters
      • Patented October 15, 1940: Jack J. Gordon, Kingsport, Tenn., Assignor to Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, N.Y. – Polyvinyl Acetal Resin Compositions Containing the Butyl Ether of Diethylene Glycol Benzoate
      • Patented December 10, 1940: Albert Hershberger, Buffalo, N.Y., Assignor to E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company, Wilmington, Delaware – Artificial Cellulosic Material Bonded to Rubber and Method of Producing the Bond, Also: # 2,224,679
      • Patented December 10, 1940: Meindert Danius Rozenbrock, Delden, Twenthe Overijsel, Netherlands – Process of Improving Fibrous Materials
      • Patented December 17, 1940: William H. Elliot, Akron, Ohio, Assignor to the B.F. Goodrich Company, New York, N.Y. – Tire
  • Folder 27 - Patents, 1941, 1942, 1943
    • This folder contains:
      • Patented January 28, 1941: Kurt Engel, St-Louis, France, and Kurt Pfaehler, Basel, Switzerland, Assignors to the Firm of J.R. Geigy A.G., Basel, Switzerland – P-Amino benzyl Acyl amines, their Quaternary Derivatives, and their Manufacture
      • Patented February 11, 1941: Ralph B. Day, Akron, Ohio, Assignor to Wingfoot Corporation, Wilmington, Delaware – Tire and Method of Making Same
      • Patented March 18, 1941: Frederick Ray, Short Hills, N.J., Assignor to Wingfoot Corporation, Wilmington, Delaware – Method for Testing Tire Cords
      • Patented June 24, 1941: Helen M. Robinson, Washington, D.C.: Dedicated to the Free Use of the People in the Territory of the United States – Process of Rendering Fabric Resistant to Fungal and Bacterial Attack
      • Patented July 1, 1941: Georg Spielberger, and Otto Bayer, Leverkusen-I.G. Werk, and Wilhem Bunge, Leverkusen-Wiesdorf, Rhine, Germany, Assignors, by Mesne Assignments, to General Aniline & Film Corporation, New York, N.Y. – Condensation Products
      • Patented July 1, 1941: Theodore A. Riehl, Akron, Ohio, Assignor to Wingfoot Corporation, Wilmington, Delaware – Rubber Bonded to Artificial Silk
      • Patented July 15, 1941: Joseph B. Dickey, and James G. McNally, Rochester, N.Y., Assignors to Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, N.Y. – Yarn Conditioning Therefor
      • Patented August 5, 1941: Donald Graham, Wilmington, Del., Assignor to E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company – Dyestuff of the Anthraquinone Series
      • Patented August 5, 1941: Frank J. Soday, Upper Darby, Pa., Assignor to the United Gas Improvement Company – Synthetic Resin and Process for Making the Same
      • Patented August 19, 1941: Roger Wallach, Briarcliff Manor, N.Y., Assignor to Sylvania Industrial Corporation, Fredericksburg, Va. – Article and Process for the Manufacture Thereof
      • Patented August 19, 1941: Carleton S. Francis, Jr., New York, N.Y. – Textile and Method of Making the Same
      • Patented September 9, 1941: Benjamin R. Harris, Chicago, Ill. – Organic Nitrogenous Base Derivatives of Ether Derivatives and Method of Making Same
      • Patented September 9, 1941: Benjamin R. Harris, Chicago, Ill. – Organic Nitrogenous Base Derivatives of Ether Derivatives and Method of Making Same
      • Patented September 9, 1941: Benjamin R. Harris, Chicago, Ill. – Sulphocarboxylic Esters
      • Patented September 9, 1941: Benjamin R. Harris, Chicago, Ill. – Aromatic Sulphocarboxylic Esters
      • Patented September 16, 1941: Richard A. Crawford, Akron, Ohio, Assignor to the B.F. Goodrich Company, New York, N.Y. – Method of Improving the Adhesion of Rubber to Cotton (2 copies)
      • Patented September 16, 1941: Joseph I. Taylor and Karl T. Schaefer, Elizabethton, Tenn., Assignors to North American Rayon Corporation, New York, N.Y. – Method of Rubberizing Cellulose Fabrics (2 copies)
      • Patented September 16, 1941: Theodore A. Rielhl, Akron, Ohio, Assignor to Wingfoot Corporation, Wilmington, Delaware – Tire Coat and the Like
      • Patented September 23, 1941: Stoney Drake, Atlanta, Georgia – Starch Size and Method of Preparing the Same
      • Patented September 30, 1941: Herman A. Bruson and Louis H. Bock, Philadelphia, Pa., Assignors to Rohm & Haas Company – Water – Repellent Process
      • Patented November 11, 1941: Bingham J. Humphrey, Akron, Ohio, Assignor to the Firestone Tire & Rubber Company – Composite Article and Method of Making the Same
      • Patented November 18, 1941: Edward T. Lessig and Ivan Gazdik, Akron, Ohio, Assignors to the B.F. Goodrich Company, New York, N.Y. – Method of Improving the Adhesion of rubber to fibrous Materials
      • Patented January 27, 1942: William T. Runals, Akron, Ohio, Assignor to the Firestone Tire & Rubber Company – Drying Apparatus
      • Patented March 31, 1942: Edward T. Lessig and Ivan Gazdik, Akron, Ohio, Assignors to the B.F. Goodrich Company, New York, N.Y. – Method of Improving the Adhesion of Rubber to Fabrics
      • Patented May 19, 1942: Edward T. Lessig, Akron, Ohio, Assignor to the B.F. Goodrich Company, New York, N.Y. – Testing Resilient Materials
      • Patented May 5, 1942: Lloyd G. Copeman, Flint, and Floyd E. Bartell, Ann Arbor, Mich., Assignors to Copeman Laboratories Company, Flint, Mich. – Process of Treating Textile Fabrics and the Product Thereof (2 copies)
      • Patented May 26, 1942: Solomon Caplan, New York, N.Y., Assignor to the Harvel Corporation – Hydrogenated Cardanol and Methods of Making the Same
      • Patented June 2, 1942: Lloyd W. Davis, Bloomfield, N.J., Assignor to National Oil Products Company, Harrison, N.J. – Filament Testing Apparatus
      • Patented July 28, 1942: Charles F. Brown and Arthur E. Brooks, Nutley, N.J., Assignors, by Mesne Assignments, to United States Rubber Company, New York, N.J. – Bonding Rubber to Fibers
      • Patented July 28, 1942: Joseph N. Borglin, Wilmington, Del., Assignor to Hercules Powder Company – Pine Oil Composition
      • Patented July 28, 1942: Louis H. Bock, Glenside, and Alva L. Houk, Philadelphia, Pa., Assignors to Rohm & Haas Company – Cellulosic Material
      • Patented July 28, 1942: Edward T. Lessig, Silver Lake, Ohio, Assignor to the B.F. Goodrich Company, New York, N.J. – Apparatus for Testing Filamentary or Strip Articles
      • Patented August 11, 1942: Robert v. Yohe, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, Assignor to the B.F. Goodrich Company, New York, N.J. – Method of Making Mildew Resistant Fibrous Products (2 copies)
      • Patented August 11, 1942: William H. Furness, Riverton, N.J., Assignor to American Rayon Company, Inc. – Method for Imparting Finish to Cotton Yarn
      • Patented September 1, 1942: Wilhelm Bergenthun and Ernst Pieper, Wuppertal-Barmen, Germany – Method of Treating Textile Material (2 copies)
      • Patented September 8, 1942: Carl F. Gram, Elizabethton, Tenn., Assignor to North American Rayon Corporation – Apparatus for Treating Yarn
      • Patented September 15, 1942: William J. Thackston, Haddon Heights, N.J., Assignor to Rohm & Haas Company – Process of Finishing Textiles
      • Patented October 27, 1942: David McQueen, Wilmington, Del., Assignor to E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company – Polymeric Materials
      • Patented November 3, 1942: Edward G. Partridge, Stow, Ohio, Assignor to the B.F. Goodrich Company – Method of Improving the Adhesion of Rubber to Cotton (2 copies0
      • Patented November 17, 1942: William Whitehead, Rye, N.Y., Assignor to Celanese Corporation of America, Delaware – Treatment of Cellulosic Yarns in the Manufacture of the Fabrics and Product
      • Patented December 22, 1942: Winton I. Patnode, Schenectady, N.Y., Assignor to General Electric Company – Method of Rendering Materials Water Repellent
      • Patented January 19, 1943: Mark W. Mayes, Marietta, Georgia – Apparatus for Dehydrating Yarn
      • Patented February 2, 1943: George T. King, Sr. Lancaster, S.C.; Walter C. King, Administrator of Said George Thomas King, Sr. Deceased – Textile Drying Apparatus
      • Patented February 9, 1943: Vincent B. Gay, Clinton Ohio, Assignor to the B.F. Goodrich Company – Tire
      • Patented February 16, 1943: Lloyd C. Greene, Sanford, Maine – Process and Apparatus for Forming and Treating Yarn
      • Patented March 9, 1943: Carleton S. Francis Jr., Chestnut Hill, Pa., Assignor to Sylvania Industrial Corporation – Textile Production and Method of Making the Same
      • Patented March 9, 1843: Roger N. Wallach, Briarcliff, N.Y., Assignor to Sylvania Industrial Corporation – Plied Yarn and Cords and Process of Producing the Same
      • Patented March 31, 1943: Ivan Gazdik and Edward T. Lessig, Akron, Ohio, Assignors to the B.F. Goodrich Company – Method of Improving the Adhesion of Rubber to Cotton (2 copies)
      • Patented March 30, 1943: Edward T. Lessig and Hal P. Headley, Akron, Ohio, Assignors to the B.F. Goodrich Company – Method of Adhering Fibers to Rubber
      • Patented March 30, 1943: Ivan Gazdik and Edward T. Lessig, Akron, Ohio, Assignors to the B.F. Goodrich Company – Method of Improving the Adhesion of Rubber to Cotton (2 copies)
      • Patented March 30, 1943: Edward T. Lessig and Hal P. Hadley, Akron, Ohio, Assignors to the B.F. Goodrich company – Method of Improving the Adhesion of Rubber to Cotton (2 copies)
      • Patented March 30, 1943: Edwin R. Littmann, Westfield, N.J., Assignor to Standard Oil Development Company – Method of Protecting Cellulosic Materials
      • Patented April 27, 1943: Harry S. Drum and William C. Dodson, Abington, Pa., Assignors to Smith, Drum and Company – Mounting for Heat Responsive Instruments Used in Yarn Package Drying
      • Patented April 27, 1943: Harold S. Howe, Detroit, Mich., Assignor to United States Rubber Company – Pneumatic Tire
      • Patented May 4, 1943: William Whitehead, Rye, N.Y., Assignor to Celanese Corporation of America – Treatment of Textile Yarns and Filaments
      • Patented May 11, 1943: Thomas F. Carruthers, South Charleston, and William N. Stoops, Charleston, W. Va., Assignors to Carbide and Carbon Chemicals Corporation – Method for Making Composite Materials
      • Patented May 25, 1943: Roger N. Wallach, Briarcliff Manor, N.Y., Assignor to Sylvania Industrial Corporation – Process for Treating Textiles
      • Patented May 25, 1943: Carleton S. Francis, Jr., Chestnut Hill, Pa., Assignor to Sylvania Industrial Corporation – Process for Making and Treating Textiles and the Products Produced
      • Patented June 1, 1943: Gaetano F. D’Alelio, Pittsfield, Mass., Assignor to General Electric Company – Aminoplast Containing a Halogenated Nitrile
      • Patented June 1, 1943: Gaetano F. D’Alelio, Pittsfield, Mass., Assignor to General Electric Company – Polysalicylide-Modified Aminoplast
      • Patented June 1, 1943: Gaetano F. D’Alelio, Pittsfield, Mass., Assignor to General Electric Company – Condensation Products of Aminotriazines Aldhehydes and Halogenated Aliphatic Nitriles
      • Patented June 1, 1943: Gaetano F. D’Alelio and James W. Underwood, Pittsfield, Mass., Assignors to General Electric Company – Reaction Products of Aldehydes and Bis-Diamino Triazinyl Disulphides
      • Patented June 1, 1943: Gaetano F. D’Alelio, Pittsfield, Mass., Assignor to General Electric Company – Condensation Products of an Aminotriazole an Aldehyde, and a Halogenated Nitrile
      • Patented June 8, 1943: Noel William Cusa, Blackley, Manchester, England, Assignor to Imperial Chemical Industries Limited – Manufacture of Tertiary Bases
      • Patented June 8, 1943: Gaetano F. D’Alelio, Pittsfield, Mass., Assignor to General Electric Company – Reaction Products of Aldehydes and Diazine Derivatives
      • Patented July 6, 1943: Gaetano F. D’Alelio, Pittsfield, Mass., Assignor to General Electric Company – Interpolymers of an Unsaturated Alkyd resin and 3-Hydroxy Alkene-1 Polyester of a Polycarboxylic Acid
      • Patented July 13, 1943: Gaetano F. D’Alelio, Pittsfield, Mass., Assignor to General Electric Company – Reaction Product of Aldehydes and Bis-(Diamino Diazinyl) Cyanoalkylene Disulphides
      • Patented July 27, 1943: Gaetano F. D’Alelio, Pittsfield, Mass., Assignor to General Electric Company – Aminoplast Modified with a Malonic Ester
      • Patented July 27, 1943: Gaetano F. D’Alelio, Pittsfield, Mass., Assignor to General Electric Company – Condensation Product of Amidogen Compounds, Aldehydes, and Ketoesters
      • Patented July 27, 1943: Earl K. Fischer, Long Island City, N.Y., Assignor to Interchemical Corporation – Latex Impregnation (2 copies)
      • Patented July 27, 1943: Vernal R. Hardy, Wilmington, Del., Assignor to E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company – Yarn Finishing
      • Patented August 10, 1943 – 2,326,605: Shailer L. Bass and Alfred A. Lawrence, Midland, Mich., Assignors to the Dow Chemical Company – Finishing Piece Goods
      • Patented August 31, 1943 – 2,328,431: Arnold Doser, Cologne, and Otto Bayer and Karl Hintzmann, Leverkusen I.G.-Werk, Germany, Assignors, by Mesne assignments, to General Aniline & Film Corporation – Process for Rendering Textile Materials Water Repellent
      • Patented October 19, 1943 – 2,331,980: Robert M. Hoffman and Ira V. Hitt, Waynesboro, Va., Assignors to E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company – Finish Applicator
      • Patented October 26, 1943 – 2,332,849: Wolfgang Gruber and Hans Machemer, Burghausen Germany; Vested in the alien Property Custodian – Softening Agent for High Polymeric Substances
      • Patented October 26, 1943 – 2,332,817: Joseph Edward Smith, Wilmington, Del., Assignor to E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company – Textile Treating Method
      • Patented November 2, 1943 – 2,333,203: Erik Schirm, Dessau in Anhalt, Germany, Assignor, by Mesne Assignments, to General Aniline & Film Corporation – Cellulose Fibers and Process of Treating Them
      • Patented November 2, 1943 – 2,333,265: Alan Henry McIntosh and Harry Edward Pfaff, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada – Rubber Product and Method of Producing Same (2 copies)
      • Patented November 16, 1943 – 2,334,199: Harley Y. Jennings, Flint, Mich., Assignor to Copeman Laboratories Company – Process of Treating Textile Materials
      • Patented November 16, 1943 – 2,334,517: Nathaniel Beverley Tucker, Glendale, Ohio, Assignor to the Procter and Gamble Company – High Molecular Weight Surface Active Amines
      • Patented November 16, 1843 – 2,334,607: Edward F. Christopher, Chicago, Ill., Assignor to Industrial Patents Corporation – Peptizing Agent
      • Patented November 16, 1943 – 2,334,420: Homer V. Lang, Charlotte, N.C. – Means for Processing Yarn
      • Patented November 23, 1943 – 2,335,101: Thomas R. Belzer and Harold Schiller, Los Angeles, Calif., Assignors to Socony-Vacuum Oil Company – Solution of Metallo-Ammonium Naphtenates
      • Patented November 30, 1943 – 2,335,384: Euclid W. Bousquet, James E. Kirby, and Norman E. Searle, Wilmington, Del., Assignors to E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company – Pest Control
      • Patented December 7, 1943 – 2,336,252: Florence E. Hooper, Yonkers, N.Y., Assignor to the Chemical Foundation, Incorporated – Treatment of Cotton (2 copies)
      • Patented December 28, 1943 – 2,337,552: Clyde O. Henke, Wilmington, Del., Assignor to E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company – Purification of Saturated Hydrocarbon Sulphonic Acids (2 copies)
      • Patented September 29, 1942 – 2,297,536 – Patented May 15, 1941 – 2.553,396 – Patented June 10, 1947 – 2,422,078 – Patented May 31, 1949 – 2,471,554: U.S. Rubber Rosin Treatment Patents
  • Folder 28 - Patents, 1944, 1945
    • This folder contains:
      • Patented January 11, 1944 – 2,338,960: Carl Ludwig Nottebohm, Weinheim, Baden Germany; Vested in the Alien Property Custodian – Process and Apparatus for the Impregnation of Fiber Fleeces with Binding Agents
      • Patented January 18, 1944 – 2,339,557: William T. Runals, Akron, Ohio, Assignor to the Firestone Tire & Rubber Company – Drying Apparatus
      • Patented February 1, 1944 – 2,340,357: Howard A. Young, Westfield, N.J., Assignor to United States Rubber Company – Process for Treating Fabrics
      • Patented February 15, 1944 – 2,341,885: Frank J. Sowa, Cranford, N.J. – Process for Coating Plastic Materials and the Product Produced
      • Patented February 29, 1944 – 2,343,090: Joseph Edward Smith, Wilmington, Del., Assignor to E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company – Treatment of Textiles and Composition Useful Therefor
      • Patented February 29, 1944 – 2,343, 095: Joseph Edward Smith, Wilmington, Del., Assignor to E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company – Resin Dispersion Useful in the Textile and Paper Industries
      • Patented March 7, 1944 – 2,343,415: Frank H. Kaufert, St-Paul, Minn., Assignor to E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company – Pest Control
      • Patented April 11, 1944 – 2,346,440: Edward T. Lessig, Silver Lake, and Edward N. Cunningham, Cuayhoga Falls, Ohio, Assignors to the E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company – Method of Improving the Adhesion of rubber to Fibrous Materials and Product Thereof (2 copies)
      • Patented April 18, 1944 – 2,347,024: Leo Beer, Philadelphia, Pa. – Impregnating Composition for Textile Materials
      • Patented April 18, 1944 – 2,346,934: Abraham B. Miller, Newark, Del., Assignor to Hercules Powder Company – Impregnated Fibrous Material
      • Patented May 2, 1944 – 2,348,165: George T. Buchanan, Chicago, Ill. – Coagulant Composition
      • Patented May 9, 1944 – 2,348,552: Julius G. Little, Wilmington, Del., Assignor to Hercules Powder Company – Textile Fiber and Method of Producing
      • Patented May 30, 1944 – 2,350,032: Onslow B. Hager, Glenside, Pa, Assignor to Rohm & Haas Company – Delustering Cellulose Ester Fabrics
      • Patented May 9, 1944 – 2,348,289: Raymond B. Frost, Rutherford, N.J., Assignor to United States Rubber Company – Application of Liquid Treating Material to Strip Material (2 copies)
      • Patented May 9, 1944 – 2,348,256: Henry L. Hollis, Chicago, Ill – Removable Tire Cover
      • Patented May 16, 1944 – 2,348,865: Robert R. Sterrett, Naugatuck, Conn., Assignor to United States Rubber Company – Latex Composition
      • Patented May 23, 1944 – 2,349,290: Dwight L. Loughborough, Akron, Ohio, Assignor to the B.F. Goodrich Company – Method of Improving the Adhesion of Nylon to rubber
      • Patented June 13, 1944 – 2,351,174: William Whitehead, Rye, N.Y. – Coated Material
      • Patented June 20, 1944 – 2,351,581: Louis H. Bock, Huntingdon Valley, and Alva L. Houk, Philadelphia, Pa., Assignors to Rohm & Haas Company – Stabilization of Cellulosic Fabrics with Oxymethyl Quaternary Salts
      • Patented June 20, 1944 – 2,351,949: Edmund A. Georgi, Wilmington, Del., Assignor to Hercules Powder Company – Heat-Treated Rosin Size
      • Patented June 27, 1944 – 2,352,409: Hillary Robinette, Jr., Arlington, Mass., Assignor to Commercial Solvents Corporation – Mercerizing Assistant
      • Patented June 27, 1944 – 2,352,573: William D. Stewart, Akron, Ohio, Assignor to the B.F. Goodrich Company – Method of preserving Latex and Product Thereof
      • Patented July 4, 1944 – 2,352,796: Earle Davis McLeod, Rumford, Assignor to Arnold Hoffman & Co. – Water-Soluble Biuret Resin and Method for Making the Same
      • Patented July 4, 1944 – 2,352,836: Kenneth L. Hertel, Knoxville, Tenn., Assignor to University of Tennessee Research Corporation – Method of and Apparatus for Determining Physical Properties of Porous Compressible Materials
      • Patented July, 4, 1944 – 2,352,835: Kenneth L. Hertel, Knoxville, Tenn., Assignor to University of Tennessee – Apparatus for and Method of Determining Physical Properties of Porous Material
      • Patented July 4, 1944 – 2,352,707: Charles F. Goldthwait, New Orleans, La., Assignor to Claude R. Wickard, as Secretary go Agriculture of the U.S.A., and his Successors in Office – Cotton Yarn for Water-Pressure Hose
      • Patented July 4, 1944 – 2,352,747: William Whitehead, Rye, N.Y., Assignor to Celanese Corporation of America – Coating Process (2 copies)
      • Patented July 4, 1944 – 2,352,738: Robert F. Ruthruff, Chicago, Ill. – Manufacture of Alkali Metal Silicates
      • Patented July 18, 1944 – 2,353,987: Frederick S. Barlette, Bristol, R.I., Assignor to United States Rubber Company – Liquid Applicator
      • Patented July 25, 1944 – 2,354,426: Raymond C. Briant, Pittsburg, Pa., Assignor to the Firestone Tire & Rubber Company – Method of Making Composite Articles (2 copies)
      • Patented August 8, 1944 – 2,355,521: Geza Ganz, London, England – Preparation of Artificial Masses
      • Patented August 8, 1944 – 2,355,265: Louis H. Bock, Huntingdon Valley, and Alva L. Houk, Philadelphia, Pa., Assignors to Rohm & Haas Company – Textile Materials
      • Patented August 29, 1944 – 2,356,774: Morris D. Marshall, Arlington, Mass, Assignor to Monsanto Chemical Company – Preparation of Sols
      • Patented September 5, 1944 – 2,357,392: Carleton S. Francis, Jr., Pine Orchard, Conn., Assignor to Sylvania Industrial Corporation – Process for Producing Fibrous Products
      • Patented September 12, 1944 – 2,358,273: David Aelony, Dayton, Ohio, Assignor to Monsanto Chemical Company – Alkyl Diamides of Aromatic Disulphonic Acids and Products Treated Therewith
      • Patented September 19, 1944 – 2,358,330: Robert M. Jones, Biddeford, and Paul B. West, Saco, Maine, Assignors to Saco-Lowell Shops – Making Fabrics
      • Patented September 19, 1944 – 2,358,402: John L. Kurlychek, Orange, N.J., Assignor to United States Rubber Company – Fungicidal Preparations (2 copies)
      • Patented September 26, 1944 – 2,358,833: Warren M. Smith, Baton rouge, La., and Carroll J. Wilson, Westfield, N.J., Assignors to Standard Oil Development Company – Antioxidant (2 copies)
      • Patented October 3, 1944 – 2,359,667: Stewart R. Ogilby, Eltingville, Staten Island, N.Y., Assignor to the United States Rubber Company – Method of Treating Aqueous Dispersions of Rubber
      • Patented October 3, 1944 – 2,359,698: Edwin C. Uhlig, Cranston, R.I., Assignor to United States Rubber Company – Method of Treating Aqueous Dispersions of Rubber
      • Patented October 24, 1944 – 2,361,270: Lucius Collins, George Anton Slowinske, and Joseph Edward Smith, Wilmington, Del., Assignors to E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company – Treatment of Textile Fiber with Water Repellency Agents
      • Patented October 24, 1944 – 2,360,946: Albert Hershberger, Kenmore, N.Y., Assignor to E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company – Reinforced Rubber Structures (2 copies)
      • Patented October 31, 1944 – 2,361,527: Frederick S. Bacon, Newton, Mass., Assignor to Monsanto Chemical Company – Method of Uniting Fibrous Materials (2 copies)
      • Patented October 31, 1944 – 2,361,543: Edwin J. Hart, Cedar Frove, N.J., and Robert T. Armstrong, New York, N.Y., Assignors to United States Rubber Company – Treatment of Rubber (2 copies)
      • Patented October 31, 1944 – 2,361,830: Oscar Edelstein Hamden, Conn., Assignor to the Pont Lily Company – Water Repellent Textile and Process of Producing the Same (2 copies)
      • Patented November 14, 1944 – 2,362,479: Carlin F. Gibbs, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, Assignor to the B.F. Goodrich Company – Antioxidant for Rubber (2 copies)
      • Patented November 14, 1944 – 2,362,915: James Hutchinson MacGregor, Bocking, Braintree, England, Assignor to Courtaulds Limited – Process for Improving the Fastness to Washing of Dyed Cellulosic Textile Materials
      • Patented November 21, 1944 – 2,362,973: Jack t. Cassaday, Stamford, Conn., Assignor to American Cyanamid Company – Noncrystalizing Rosin Size and Method of Making the Same
      • Patented November 28, 1944 – 2,363,981: Edward T. Lessig, Silver lake, and Edward N. Cunnigham, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, Assignors to the B.E. Goodrich Company – Method of Improving the Adhesion of Rubber to Fibrous Materials and Product Thereof (2 copies0
      • Patented December 5, 1944 – 2,364,391: Harold Schiller, Los Angeles, Calif., Assignor to Socony-Vacuum Oil Company – Treatment of Fabrics with Metallic Soaps (2 copies)
      • Patented December 19, 1944 – 2,365,402: Robert N. Foster, Anniston, Ala., Assignor to Monsanto Chemical Company – Textile Process and Product
      • Patented January 2, 1945 – 2,366,347: Henry Edmond Millson, Plainfield, N.J. – Method of Dyeing
      • Patented January 2, 1945 – 2,366,198: Herbert E. Kresse and Charles F. Dulken, Arlington, N.J. – Apparatus for Treating Yarn
      • Patented January 30, 1945 – 2,368,386: John P. Tarbox, Philadelphia, Pa., Assignor, by Mesne Assignments, to Industrial Rayon Corporation – Method of and Device for Treating Threads and the Like
      • Patented January 30, 1945 – 2,368,435: Percy A. Wells, Abington, and Roy W. Riemenschneider, Glenside, Pa., Assignors to Claude R. Wickard, as Secretary of Agriculture of the Unites States of America and his Successors in Office – Antioxidant
      • Patented February 6, 1945 – 2,368,782: Alfred L. Rummelsburg, Wilmington, Del., Assignor to Hercules Powder Company – Textile Finishing Material
      • Patented February 6, 1945 – 2,368,648: Charles F. Dulken and Herbert E. Kresse, Arlington, N.J. – Apparatus for Treating Thread
      • Patented February 20, 1945 – 2,370,031: Charles Graenacher, Riehen, Richard Sallmann, Bottmingen, Otto Albrecht, Munchenstein, and Jost Frei, Basel, Switzerland, Assignors to Society of Chemical Industry – Process for Improving Fibrous Material and the Material Treated by such Process
      • Patented February 20, 1945 – 2,369,769: Ernest K. Bauer, Meadville, Pa., Assignor to American Viscose Corporation – Apparatus for the Liquid Treatment of Yarn and the Like (2 copies)
      • Patented February 20, 1945 – 2,370,057: Gerry P. Mack, Jackson Heights, N.Y., Assignor to Advance Solvents & Chemical Corporation – Finishing and Dressing Agents for Fibrous Materials
      • Patented February 27, 1945 – 2,370,550: Alfred A. Lawrence, Port Chester, N.Y. and Shailer L. Bass, Midland, Mich., Assignors to the Dow Chemical Company – Stiffened Fabrics
      • Patented March 20, 1945 – 2,371,618: Alden W. Hanson, and William C. Goggin, Midland, Mich., Assignors to the Dow Chemical Company – Preservation of Textile Materials (3 copies)
      • Patented March 20, 1945 – 2,371,892: John M. Hood, Old Greenwich, Conn., Assignor to American Cyanamid Company – Permanent Finish for Textiles
      • Patented April 10, 1945 – 2,373,335: Philip T. Paul, Naugatuck, Conn., Assignor to United States Rubber Company – Antioxidants
      • Patented April 24, 1945 – 2,374,446: Ralph E. Madison, Detroit, Mich., Assignor to Truscon Laboratories, Inc. – Metallic Soap-Resin Solutions
      • Patented May 1, 1945 – 2,375,089: Earle S. Ebers, Nutley, N.J., Assignor to United States Rubber Company – Rubber Fabric Material
      • Patented May 8, 1945 – 2,375,261: Joseph T. Taylor, and Karl T. Schaefer, Elisabethon, Tenn., Assignors to North American Rayon corporation – Thread and/or Fabric (2 copies0
      • Patented May 8, 1945 – 2,375,406: Lyle L. Drown, Detroit, Mich., Assignor to General Motors Corporation – Nonoverfill Device
      • Patented June 19, 1945 – 2,378,614: Charles Thomas Zahn, Wilmington, Del., Assignor to American Viscose Corporation – Device for Measuring Yarn Friction
      • Patented June 26, 1945 – 2,379,264: Roger Wallach, Briarcliff Manor, N.Y., Assignor, to Mesne Assignments, to American Viscose Corporation – Process for Producing Potentially Adhesive Textile Fibers
      • Patented June 26, 1945 – 2,379,294: Chester M. Gooding, Staten Island, N.Y., Assignor, by Mesne Assignments, to the Best Foods Inc. – Process of Inhibiting Growth of Molds (2 copies)
      • Patented July 10, 1945 – 2,380,003: William Whitehead, Rye, N.Y., Assignor to Celanese Corporation – Textile Product
      • Patented July 10, 1945 – 2,380,133: Ernst Waltmann and Edgar Wolf, Krefeld, Germany, Assignors to Heberlein Patent Corporation – Process for Rendering Textiles Water-Repellent
      • Patented July 31, 1945 – 2,380,775: Hans Meyer, Twickenham, England – Compound Fabrics and Process for Producing the Same
      • Patented August 7, 1945 – 2,381,020: Benjamin G. Wilkes, Wilkingsburg, Pa., and Walter A, Denison, south Charleston, Va., Assignors to Carbide and Carbon Chemicals Corporation – Antistatic Treatment of Vinyl Resin Textiles (2 copies)
      • Patented August 7, 1945 – 2,381,852: Carroll a. Hochwait, Montgomery County, Ohio, Assignor to Monsanto Chemical Company – Treatment of Textiles (2 copies)
      • Patented August 14, 1945 – 2,381,863: Paul George Benignus, Belleville, Ill., Assignor to Monsanto Chemical Company – Method of Fungusproofing Textiles (2 copies0
      • Patented August 28, 1945 – 2,383,505: Malcolm H. Lyle, Johnson City, and Clifton B. Smith, Elisabethon, Tenn., Assignors to North American Rayon Corporation – Yarn Lubrication
      • Patented September 23, 1945 – 2,256,877: Heinrich Bertsch, Chemnitz, Saxony, Germany, Assignor to American Hyalsol Corporation – Wetting, Penetrating, Foaming, and Dispersing Agent
      • Patented September 25, 1945 – 2,385,766: Jack T. Thurston, Cos Cob, Conn., Assignor to American 
        Cyanamid Company – Guanamines in Textile Finishing
      • Patented October 2, 1945 – 2,386,140: Maurice Arthur Thorold Rogers, Blackley, Manchester, England, Assignor to Imperial Chemical Industries Limited – Water-Repellency Agents and Processes of Making and Using the Same
      • Patented October 2, 1945 – 2,386,141: Maurice Arthur Thorold Rogers, Blackley, Manchester, England, Assignor to Imperial Chemical Industries Limited – Process of Treating Textile Materials
      • Patented October 2, 1945 – 2,386,144: John B. Rust, Verona, N.J., Assignor to Ellis Foster Company – Textile Sizing Compositions and Process of Making Them
      • Patented October 9, 1945 – 2,386,259: Francis J. Norton, Schenectady, N.Y., Assignor to General electric Company – Waterproofing treatment of Materials
      • Patented November 20, 1945 – 2,389,459: Isidore J. Remark and Vaughn V. Wheeler, Akron, Ohio, assignors to the General Tire & Rubber Company – Method and Apparatus for Applying an Adhesive Coating to cord Fabric
      • Patented November 20, 1945 – 2,389,120: Carl a. Castellan, Wilmington, Del., Assignor to American Viscose Corporation – Textile and Process of Making Same
      • Patented November 27, 1945: Murray Senkus, Terre Haute, Ind., Assignor to Commercial Solvents Corporation – Surface Active Agents
      • Patented November 27, 1945 – 2,390,033: James W. Stallings, Haddon Heights, N.J., Assignor to Rohm & Haas Company – Fabric Fire Hose
  • Folder 29 - Patents, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949
    • This folder contains:
      • Patented January 1, 1946 – 2,391,905: Hans O. Kauffmann, Eggerstville, Edward S. Shanley, Kenmore, and Robert L. McEwen, Williamsville, N.Y., Assignors to Buffalo Electro-Chemical Company, Inc. – Textile Treatment
      • Patented January 8, 1946 – 2,392,574: Charles F. Brown, Grosse Pointe Park, Mich., assignor to United States Rubber Company – Adhesives (2 copies)
      • Patented March 5, 1946 – 2,395,922: William D. Timmons, Coshocton, Ohio – Fireproofing Coating Method and Product
      • Patented April 2, 1946 – 2,397,732: Kenneth M. Gaver, Columbus, Ohio, Assignor, by Mesne Assignments, to the Ohio State University Research Foundation – Mildewproofing (2 copies)
      • Patented April 9, 1946 – 2,398,272: David Aelony, Dayton, Ohio, Assignor to Monsanto Chemical Company – Treatment of Textiles
      • Patented March 28, 1946 – 2,345,032: Martin Castricum, Grosse Pointe, Mich., assignor to United States Rubber Company – Drier for Yarns or Cords
      • Patented April, 16, 1946 – 2,398,516: Alfred Burgeni, East Orange, and Roy L. Keown, Belleville, N.J., Assignors to the Clark Thread Company – Method of Wetting thread (2 copies)
      • Patented June 11, 1946 – 2,402,021: Jack Compton, Cuyahoga, Ohio, Assignor to the B.F. Goodrich Company – Method of Improving the Adhesion of Nylon to rubber (3 copies)
      • Patented June 25, 1946 – 2,402,609: Camiel de Brabander, Newport, Del., Assignor to American Viscose Corporation – Device for Treating Filamentary Material (2 copies)
      • Patented August 27, 1946 – 2,406,412: John Bamber, Speakman and Thomas Barr, Leeds, England, Assignors to Imperial Chemical Industries Limited – Treatment of Wool Fibers
      • Patented September 3, 1946 – 2,407,105: George W. Seymour and Walter Brooks, Cumberland, Md., Assignors to Celanese Corporation of America – High Tenacity Filamentary Materials
      • Patented September 10, 1946 – 2,407,548: Joseph Goldman, New Brunswick, N.J., Assignor to Fiber Products Laboratories, Inc. – Fibrous Structural Material and Method and Apparatus for Making Same
      • Patented October 22, 1946 – 2,409,703: Arthur Lyem, Cumberland, Md., Assignor to Celanese Corporation of America – Preparation of Laminating Fabric
      • Patented October 22, 1946 – 2,409,704: Arthur Lyem, Cumberland, Md., Assignor to Celanese Corporation of America – Production of Laminating Fabrics
      • Patented November 5, 1946 – 2,410,788: Willard L. Morgan, Columbus, Ohio, and Earle D. McLeod, Rumford, R.I., Assignors to Arnold, Hoffman & Co. Incorporated – Fatty amide Polymers
      • Patented December 31, 1946 – 2,413,428: Howard J. Billings, South Acton, Mass., Assignor to Monsanto Chemical Company – Lubrication of Textile Fibers
      • Patented January 28, 1947 – 2,425,017: Charles A. MacKenzie, Upper Montclair, N.J., Assignor to Montclair Research Corporation – Textile Treating Compounds Containing Silicon and the Process of Making Same
      • Patented March 18, 1947 – 2,417,453: Worth Wade, New York, N.Y., assignor to American Viscose Corporation – Process of Producing a Textile Product
      • Patented February 4, 1947 – 2,415,112: George W. Seymour and George C. Ward, Cumberland, Md., Assignors to Celanese Corporation of America – Flame and Fireproofing of Textile Materials
      • Patented April 8, 1947 – 2,418,752: Kenneth R. Brown, West Chester, Pa., Assignor, by Mesne Assignments, to American Viscose Corporation – Yarn Having the Twist Set Therein with an Unctuous Solid
      • Patented June 24, 1947 – 2,422,666: Calvin S. Fuller, Chatham, N.J., Assignor to Bell Telephone Laboratories Incorporated – Polycarbonamides Modified by Chromic Salts
      • Patented July 22, 1947 – 2,424,403: Alvin Lodge, Detroit, Mich., Assignor to American Viscose Corporation – Apparatus for the Fluid Treatment of Yarns and the Like
      • Patented August 5, 1947 – 2,435,037: Thomas Jackson and Frank Brentnall Hill, Spondon near Derby, England, Assignors to British Celanese Limited – Fluid Treating Apparatus for Yarns
      • Patented August 5, 1947 – 2,425,214: Helmut Voelker, Silvertown, Ga., and William H. Wolfe, Lancaster, S.C., Assignors to the B.F. Goodrich Company – Apparatus for Spraying Beamed Yarns
      • Patented August 26, 1947 – 2,426,415: Paul r. Rose, East orange, N.J. – Warp Drier with Air Recirculating Means
      • Patented October 7, 1947 – 2,428,716: John Heron McGill, Manchester, and Leslie Budworth Morgan, Baguley, England, Assignors to Imperial Chemical Industries Limited – Method of Coating Fabric with Polyvinyl Chloride (2 copies)
      • Patented July 22, 1947 – 2,424,386: Rudolph Herbert Czeczowitzka, Pendleton, Salford, England, Assignor to Texproof Limited – Method of Coating Textile Fabric with Polyvinyl resin
      • Patented November 11, 1947 – 2,430,560: Stanley M. Elliot, Akron, Ohio, Assignor to the B.F. Goodrich Company – Tire
      • Patented December 16, 1947 – 2,432,630: John F. Purdy, Akron, Ohio, Assignor to Wingfoot Corporation – Pneumatic Tire
      • Patented March 23, 1948 – 2,438,366: James William Illingworth, Little Aston, Sutton Coldfield, England, Assignor to Dunlop Rubber Company Limited – Drying of Textile Materials
      • Patented May 4, 1948 – 2,441,071: Charles J. Jahant, Akron, Ohio, assignor to the General Tire & Rubber Company – Pneumatic Tire and Method of Making Same
      • Patented June 8, 1948 – 2,442,880: Aaron Schwartz, New York, N.Y., Assignor to Celanese Corporation of America – Textile Product
      • Patented June 15, 1948 – 2,443,512: Donald H. Powers, Winchester, Mass., and William J. Harrison, East Greenwich, R.I., Assignors to Monsanto Chemical Company – Treatment of Textile fibers (4 copies)
      • Patented August 31, 1948 – 2,448,153: John David Reid and George C. Daul, New Orleans, La., Assignors to the United States of America – Process of making Cotton Textiles Water-Absorbent and Rotresistant (2 copies)
      • Patented August 31, 1948 – 2,448,247: Carl R. Bellwood, Ridgefield, N.J., Assignor to the Cravenette Company – Treatment of Textiles with Acyloxy-substituded Aromatic Acid Salts
      • Patented October 12, 1948 – 2,450,948: Boutwell H. foster, Maplewood, N.J., Assignor to United States Rubber Company – Method of Making Elastic Fabrics
      • Patented October 12, 1948 – 2,450,939: Pierre Cor, Paris, France – Vibration Fatigue Testing Method and Machine
      • Patented November 9, 1948 – 2,453,366: William H. Furness, Haddonfield, N.J., Assignor to American Rayon Company, Inc. – Method and Apparatus for Liquid Treatment of Yarn, Thread, and the Like
      • Patented December 14, 1948 – 2,456,288: Jean G. Kern, Orchard Park, N.Y., Assignor to Allied Chemical & Dye Corporation – Process of Dyeing Nylon-Acetate Mixed Fabric with 3-Nitro-4-Amino-2-Chlorobiphenyl
      • Patented December 21, 1948 – 2,456,974: Thomas S. Mayner, Willoughby Township, Lake County, and E. Paul Hurayt, Cleveland, Ohio, Assignors to Industrial Rayon corporation – Thread Drying Apparatus
      • Patented December 21, 1948 – 2,456,925: Lorin A. Corey, Cleveland Heights, and Thomas S. Mayner, Willoughby Township, Lake County, Ohio, Assignors to Industrial Rayon Corporation – Thread Drying Apparatus
      • Patented January 18, 1949 – 2,459,620: Roy Cleeland, Meadowbrook, Louis J. Kelley, Upper Darby, and Walter S. Davis, Roxborough, Pa. – Process of manufacturing Textile Materials
      • Patented January 18, 1949 – 2,459,738: Irven B. Prettyman and George P. Bosomworth, Akron, and Duncan C. Milner, Barberton, Ohio, Assignors to the Firestone Tire & Rubber Company – Cord Testing Apparatus
      • Patented February 8, 1949 – 2,460,879: William H. Furness, Haddonfield, N.J., Assignor to American Viscose Corporation – Drying and Conditioning of Yarns
      • Patented March 1, 1949 – 2,463,111: Charles H. Jones, Warwick, R.I., Assignor to Universal Winding Company – Strand Coating and Winding Machine
      • Patented March 15, 1949 – 2,464,342: Frederick F. Pollak, Brooklyn, and Josef Fassel, Marmaroneck, N.Y. – Manufacture of Waterproof and Water-repellent Noninflammable fibrous Materials
      • Patented May 6, 1949 – 2,240,505: Edward T. Lessig, Akron, Ohio, Assignor to the B.F. Goodrich Company – Method of and Apparatus for Fatigue Testing Filamentary Articles
      • Patented August 30, 1949 – 2,480,811: William C. McCoy, Cleveland, Ohio, Assignor to the General Tire and Rubber Company – Tire and Method of Making
      • Patented November 1, 1949 – 2,486,803: Raymond B. Seymour and George M. Schroder, Chattanooga, Tenn., Assignors to Henry H. Frede and company – Absorbent Fibrous Sheets and Method of Making Same
      • H. Frede and company - Absorbent Fibrous Sheets and Method of Making Same
  • Folder 30 - Patents, 1950,1951,1952,1953,1954,1955,1956,1957,1958,1859,1960,1961
    • This folder contains:
  • Patented March 28, 1950 – 2,502,406: Donald Entwistle, Coventry, England, Assignor to Courtaulds Limited – Bonding of Rayon Filaments to rubber
  • Patented May 9, 1950 – 2,507,200: John R. Elliott and Robert H. Krieble, Schenectady, N.Y., assignors to General electric Company – Process for Rendering Materials Water-Repellent and Compositions Thereof
  • Patented July 4, 1950 – 2,514,197: Frank L. Groten, Upper Montclair, N.J., and William J. Nanfeldt, New Castle, Ind., assignors to the Firestone Tire & Rubber Company – Splicing Thermoplastic Monofilaments
  • Patented October 3, 1950 – 2,524,399: Dwight L. Schoene and victor S. Chambers, Naugatuck, Conn., assignors to United States Rubber company – Cellulose Treated with Di-Vinyl Sulfone to Shrinkproof
  • Patented October 17, 1950 – 2,526,462: Oscar Edelstein, Hamden, Conn., assignor to the Pond Lily Company – Moisture-Resistant Flameproofed Product and Method of Making Same
  • Patented October 24, 1950 – 2,526,684: Donald H. Powers, concord, and William J. Harrison, Reading, Mass., assignors to Monsanto Chemical Company – Runproof Stocking
  • Patented January 2, 1951 – 2,536,312: Oivin Saether, Aalesund, Norway – fishing Line
  • Patented May 22, 1951 – 2,553,815: Charles F. Dulken, Montclair, Helmuth C. Sonntag, Newark, and George Westwater, Irvington, N.J. – Applicator for Yarn Conditioning Liquids
  •  Patented May 29, 1951 – 2,555,277: George L. Royer, North Plainfield, and Chester A. Amick, Bound Brook, N.J., assignors to American Cyanamid Company – Composition for Shrinkproofing and Mothproofing Woolen Textiles
  • Patented July 31, 1951 – 2,562,161: Jack Epelberg, Cohoes, and Raymond E. Pemrick, Troy, N.Y., assignors to Cluett, Peabody & co. – Stabilization of Regenerated Cellulose Fabric with Glyoxal-Amide Reaction Product
  • Patented October 9, 1951 – 2,570,750: Jackson Bauer, Newport Ville, Pa., assignor to Fred Whitaker Company – Brashening of Wool (2 copies)
  • Patented October 9, 1951 – 2,570,830: Justin J. McCarthy, Arlington, and William J. Harrison, Reading, Mass., assignors to Monsanto Chemical Company – Method of Sizing Textile Warp Yarns
  • Patented November 6, 1951 – 2,574,114: Rene Leon Lehmann, Paris, and Josef Lintner, La Garenne Colombes, France, assignors to Bozel-Maletra Societe Industrielle de Produits Chimiques – Amide-Glyoxal-Formalderhyde Reaction Product and Shrinkproofing Cellulose Textile Fibers Therewith
  • Patented December 18, 1950 – 2,578,892: William Edward Lord, Harlington, England, assignor to Electric and Musical Industries Limited – Sound Recording Disk
  • Patented March 25, 1952 – 2,590,586: Walter E. Thompson, Jr., Watertown, and Rollin W.Taylor, Terryville, Conn. – Fish Net Formed of Synthetic Resin strands and Strands Therefor and Method of Producing Same
  • Patented April 22, 1952 – 2,594,210: Loren D. Potter, Enderlin, N. Dak., and Burt P. Johnson, Charlottesville, Va., assignors to Wingfoot Corporation – Resin Bonded Cord (2 copies)
  • Patented April 15, 1952 – 2,592,632: Ollie L. Williamson, Danville, Va., assignor to Dan River Mills, Incorporated – Apparatus for Treating Yarns (2 copies)
  • Patented May 27, 1952 – 2,598,239: Charles F. Dulken, Montclair, Helmuth C. Sonntag, Newark, and George Westwater, Irvington, N.J. – Conditioning Yarn, Thread and the Like
  • Patented August 12, 1952 – 2,606,845: Howard A. Van Etten, Monroe, N.Y., assignor to E. i. du Pont de Nemours & company – Process for Adhering Polyvinyl Chloride coating to Nylon Fabric
  • Patented September 2, 1952 – 2,617,748: Richard R. la Torre and Thomas W. George, Washington, D.C. – Mount for Tensile Testing Specimens of Textile Material
  • Patented November 11, 1952 – 2,617,748: Johan Bjorksten, Chicago, Ill., and Luther Yaeger, Hammond, Ind., assignors to Nash Kelvinator Corporation – Polystyrene article Provided with a Ray Filtering Coating
  • Patented December 23, 1952 – 2,622,307: Edward J. Cogovan and Edwin D. Friderici, Amsterdam, N.Y., assignor to Mohawk Carpet Mills, Inc. – Soil-Resistant Pile Fabric
  • Patented December 30, 1952 – 2,623,834: Norman Andrew Armitage, Watford, and John Henderson, Manchester, England, assignors to Imperial Chemical Industries Limited – Coloring Process for Nylon
  • Patented April 14, 1953 – 2,635,055: Hans G. Figdor, Philadelphia, Pa. – Water Repellent Composition
  • Patented June 23, 1953 – 2,643, 207: Donald Entwistle, Coventry, England, assignor to Courtaulds Limited – Bonding of Textile Yarns to Rubber
  • Patented July 14, 1953 – 2,645,266: Ferdinand H. Muller, Roseland, and Paul E. Johnson, Verona, N.J., assignors to specialties development Corporation – Reinforced Rubber Structure and Method of Treatment Nylon Yarn for Use in Making Same
  • Patented December 1, 1953 – 2,661,263: Morris L. Nielsen, Dayton, Ohio, assignor to Monsanto Chemical Company – Phosphorous Oxychloride and Ammonia reaction Products in flame Retarding compositions Applied to Cellulosic Materials
  • Patented June 8, 1954 – 23,837: Philip C. Waite, Oshkosh, Wis., Assignor to Waite Carpet Company – Rug
  • Patented September 21, 1954 – 2,689,813: Beardsley Lawrence, Boston, Mass., Assignor to Fiberbond Laboratories, Inc. – Method for Making Continuous Twistless Bonded yarn
  • Patented October 5, 1954 – 2,690,953: John E. Livak and Lamont Hagan, Clemson, S.C., Assignors to Deering Milliken Research Trust – Fugitive Tinting of Nylon Fibers
  • Patented November 2, 1954 – 2,693,427: Carleton L. Kingsford, Malden, Mass, Assignor to Monsanto Chemical Company – Treatment of Textile and Cellulosic Material
  • Patented November 9, 1954 – 2,693,994: Henry R. Mautner, Hackensack, N.J., Assignor to General Aniline & film corporation – Vat Colors on Nylon
  • Patented January 11, 1955 – 2,698,972: Lawrence M. Keeler, Whitinsville, Mass. – Method of assembling Textile Fibers Hydraulically
  • Patented February 1, 1955 – 2,701,218: Ralph f. Nickerson, Marblehead, Mass., Assignor to Monsanto chemical Company – Process of Treatment of Textile Material with Silica
  • Patented July 26, 1955 – 2,713,784: Paul M. Cole, Claymont, Del., Assignor to E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company – Tubular Coil Yarn Processor
  • Patented August 2, 1955 – 2,714,571: Clarence E. Irion, North Pownal, Vt., and Karl E. Prindle, shaker Heights, Ohio, Assignors to the Dobeckmun company – Process for bonding a Polyethylene film to a Fibrous Web
  • Patented August 23, 1955 – 2,716,083: Ernest T. Tallis, Coventry, England, Assignor to Courtaulds Limited – Bonding of Yarns to rubber
  • Patented October 11, 1955 – 2,720,100: Franz Wiskemann, Milan, Italy – Apparatus for the Fluid treatment of Filamentary Material
  • Patented September 6, 1955 – 2,717,193: Simon A. Simon, Longmeadow, and Harvey Clayton Ruhf, Springfield, Mass., Assignors to Chicopee Manufacturing Corporation – Bleaching Process for Cotton of Low Grade for color
  • Patented January 31, 1956 – 2,733,178: Allan R. Stevenson, Attleboro, Mass., Assignor, by Mesne Assignments, to American Sisakraft Corporation – String
  • Patented February 14, 1956 – 2,734,841: Peter Merriman, Liverpool, England, assignor to Dunlop Tire and Rubber Corporation – Method of Making bonded Resilient Fibrous material
  • Patented March 6, 1956 – 2,737,466: William P. Utermolhen, Jr., Moorestown, N.J., and John C. Bletzinger, Neenah, Wis., Assignors, by Mesne Assignments, to Kimberly-Clark Corporation – Spliced Fabric
  • Patented May 24, 1956 – 2,743,194: Robert G. Berner and Edgar Dare Bolinger, Stamford, Conn., Assignors, by Mesne Assignments, to Deering Miliken Research Corporation – Sizing of Textile Yarn
  • Patented May 22, 1956 – 2,746,898: Howard M. Buckwalter and Joseph M. Almand Detroit, Mich., Assignors to United States Rubber Company – Dry Adhesion Method for Adhering Textile Material to rubber
  • Patented June 5, 1956 – 2,749,256: Robert roger Bottoms, Crestwood, Ky., Assignor to national cylinder Gas Company – Process of Impregnating Cellulosic Materials with Copper in Chemically Bound Relation with the Cellulose
  • Patented June 12, 1956 – 2,749,960: Harold G. Schwartz, Woodstown, N.J., Assignor to E.I. du Pont de Nemours & company – Composite Structures
  • Patented December 11, 1956 – 2,773,297: Louis M. Cotchett, Whitman, Mass. – Process and apparatus for Making Yarn and Fabric
  • Patented April 30, 1957 – 2,790,737: Roy H. Kienle, bound Brook, and Elliot s. Pierce, Plainfield, N.J., and Pauline Newman, New York, N.J., assignors to American Cyanamid Company – Soil Retardant Fabric and composition and Process for Producing the Same
  • Patented January 21, 1958 – 2,820,876: Pieter van Dijk, Velp, Netherlands, assignor to American Enka Corporation – Yarn Heating apparatus
  • Patented May 13, 1958 – 2,834,205: Bryan Pickup, Sutton Coldfield, England, Assignor to Dunlop rubber Company – Adhesion Testing Machines
  • Patented June 17, 1958 – 2,839,443: John J. Fleming, Grosse Pointe Woods, Mich., Assignor to united States Rubber Company – Adhesion of Textile Fabric to Butyl Rubber
  • Patented March 3, 1959 – 2,876,140: Robert E.Sheehan, Macon, Ga, Assignor to Bibb Manufacturing Company – Soil Resistant Textile Material and Method of Making the Same
  • Patented June 2, 1959 – 2,888,823: Kenneth L. Hertel, Knoxville, Tenn., Assignor to University of Tennessee Research Corporation – Apparatus for Testing Compressible Fibrous Materials
  • Patented August 25, 1959 – 2,901,312: Francis George Audas, Cheadle Hulme, England, Assignor to the British Rayon Research Association – Process Utilizing Fluidized Beds in the Dyeing of Fabrics, Yarns and the Like
  • Patented December 15, 1959 – 2,917,422: Richard C. Waller, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, Assignor, by Mesne Assignments, to Goodyear tire & Rubber Company – Method of bonding Cord to Rubber
  • Patented November 22, 1960 – 2,961,344: Ira S. Hurd and George M. Haynes, Spartanburg, S.C., Assignors to Moretex Chemical Products, Inc. – Method of Treating a Woven Glass Fabric with a Water Soluble Salt of a Partially Deacetylated Chitin
  • Patented March 14, 1961 – 2,974,391: Raymond Holden Speakman and Roderick Bruce Macleod, Harrogate, England, Assignors to Imperial Chemical Industries Limited – Process and Apparatus for Making Crimped Filaments
  • Patented May 9, 1961 – 2,983,651: John Robert Seemuller, Maisons-Lafitte, France, Assignor to Societe Monsavon-L’Oreal – Dyeing of animal Fibres
  • Patented June 20, 1961 – 2,988,799: Everett C. Atwell, Greensboro, N.C., Assignor to Burlington Industries, Inc. – Process for Treating Yarns, Filaments and Fibers
  • Patented June 27, 1961 – 2,989,882: Robert K. Remer, Elgin, Ill., Assignor to Tribute Company – Method and apparatus for Slitting Paper Webs
  • Patented August 22, 1961 – 2,996,872: Zbigniew K. Porcynski, shelf, Near Halifax, England, Assignor to Scandura Incorporated – Composite Yarns or Cord and Fabrics Made Therefrom
  • Patented August 22, 1961 – 2,996,873: William McDowell Amstrong, La Grange, Ga., Assignor to Callaway Mills Company – Method for Producing Multi-Colored Single Yarn
  • Patented September 12, 1961: Harold A. Schwartz, Norwalk, Conn., Assignor to Patchogue-Plymouth Corporation – Backings for Tufted Fabrics
  • Patented October 24, 1961 – 3,005,472: Robert Allen Kasey, Jr., Everett Harris Rinker, Jr., and Vernal Hardy Scheuerman, Wilmington, Del., Assignors to E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company – Woven Fabric
  • Patented October 31, 1961 – 3,006,057: Philip C. Waite, Oshkosh, Wis., Assignor to Waite Carpet Company – Floor Covering

Box 2

  • Folder 1 - Patent Applications, 1953, 1954, 1955
    • This folder contains:
      • Correspondence - Handwritten Notes - Outline of Patent Application, September 21, 1953: Prevention of Ultra Violet Light Degradation of Nylon as Used in Seine Twine, Maitre Cord, etc. - Patent Application on nylon Treatment for Resistance to U.V. Radiation, 1953 - Patent Application on Invention of Soil Resistant Compound and Treatment - Patent application: Improved Polyamide Cord and Process for Making Same - Process for Imparting Soil-resistance to Rugs - Soil-Proofing Treatment - Soil Resistant Textile Materials
  • Folder 2 - Product, Price, etc...., 1950s
    • This folder contains:
      • Correspondence - Handwritten Notes - Brochure: Photovolt Corporation, Photoelectric and Electronic Measuring Instruments -
  • Folder 3 - Purchase Orders - Invoices, 1960s
  • Folder 4 - Reports: National Cotton Council of America, 1944, 1950, 1952, 1954
  • Folder 5 - Research and Development, 1943, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1954, 1955, 1959
  • Folder 6 - Sales
  • Folder 7 - Store Room Receipts - Material Delivered to Mill, 1961, 1962
  • Folder 8 - Task Group, Measurement Rug Soiling & Photo, 1950s
  • Folder 9 - Technical Department, 1954, 1955
  • Folder 10 - Textile Fibers, Technical Information
  • Folder 11 - Time Sheet, 1933, 1934, 1935
  • Folder 12 - Training Manual - Cloth Graders, 1960s, 1970s
    • This folder contains:
      • Cloth Grading Program - Weekly Defect Reports - Federal Standard Glossary of Fabric Imperfections, 1963 - Federal Specification Cloth, Sheeting, Cotton, and Polyester and Cotton, 1964 - Defect Analysis Program - "A.M. Training for cloth Graders", Jackson Mills # 2, Wellford, S.C.
  • Folder 13 - Training System Manual
    • This folder contains:
      • The A.M. Training Scheme, Instructor's Manual Index: General Basis of the Scheme - Training Procedure - Outline of a Training course - Notes for Guidance of Instructors - Introduction of New Trainees - Notes on Graphs and Their Uses - The "Break-through" in Training - Use of Devices - Daily Routine - Talks to Trainees - Re-Craining - Transfer to Production
  • Folder 14 - "Where Am I?" Location Cards, 1935, 1936
  • Folder 15 - Yarn Grading, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954
  • Folder 16 - Weaver Training Manual, Columbus Plan, March 1966
    • This folder contains:
      • The Analytical Method of Weaver Training for Bibb Manufacturing Company, Columbus Plant, Columbus, Ga, Prepared by: Geoffrey Ladham Associates, New York, N.Y., and March 1966: Course Outline - General Exercises - Basic Exercises - Combined Exercises - Production Exercises - Quality Exercises - Stamina Exercises - 75a - Charts & Forms

Series 2: Projects

Box 1

  • Folder 1 - Project # 361,115: Cotton Department (Dyeing), August 23, 1950
  • Folder 2 - Project # 430,015: Dan River BGN Yarn, 1948
  • Folder 3 - Project # 431,015: Upgrading Stocks, I, 1940s, 1950s, 1960s
  • Folder 4 - Project # 431,020: To Improve Cotton (Cheaper) I, 1940s
  • Folder 5 - Project # 431,020: To Improve Cotton II, 1940s
  • Folder 6 - Project # 431,105: NAR, 1940s
  • Folder 7 - Project # 431,107: Cotton Seine Twine & Sample, I, 1940s, 1950s
  • Folder 8 - Project # 431, 107: Cotton Seine Twine & Samples, II, 1950s, 1940s
  • Folder 9 - Project # 440, 530: Duplicating Results without Using the Process Covered by Jennings Patent, 1944, 1945
  • Folder 10 - Project # 441,129: Rayon Belt Cord, 1940s
  • Folder 11 - Project # 441, 228: Rubber, 1940s
  • Folder 12 - Project # 450,112: Experiments with Hose Cord I, 1940s
  • Folder 13 - Project # 450,112: Hydraulic Brake Cord II, 1940s, 1950s
  • Folder 14 - Project # 450,129, 1945, 1946
  • Folder 15 - Project # 450,213: "Investigation of Temperature and Relative Humidity in Twister Rooms at Columbus Mill", 1945, 1946
  • Folder 16 - Project # 450,321: Experiments with Hose cord & Sample, 1945-1949
  • Folder 17 - Project # 450,413: Rayon research, 1945
  • Folder 18 - Project # 450,414: Rayon Product Improvements, 1945
  • Folder 19 - Project # 460,101: Experiments with Rayon Thread, 1946-1953
  • Folder 20 - Project # 460,125: To improve Laundry Nets, 1948
  • Folder 21 - Project # 460,422: To Evaluate the Strength of Tine Cord, 1946
  • Folder 22 - Project # 460,508: Spinning and Twisting Tape to Reduce the Expense and Improve the Performance of Present Tapes Being Used, 1946
  • Folder 23 - Project # 460,610: Destretching Twine, 1948
  • Folder 24 - Project # 460,617: Insulation Yarn, Rayon Waste, 1948
  • Folder 25 - Project # 460,827: Gates Tire cord, 1946
  • Folder 26 - Project # 461,010: IBI versus Various Mix, 1946
  • Folder 27 - Project # 461,111: Judging Cotton, 1950
  • Folder 28 - Project # 461,115: Judging Cotton I, 1950s
  • Folder 29 - Project # 461,115: Judging cotton, Daisy Yarn II, 1950s

Box 2

  • Folder 1 - Project # 470,101: Flame proofing/ the Application of "Erifon" to yarn in Ball Warp Form, 1947-1950, 1952
  • Folder 2 - Project # 470,122: Tire Cord Stock, 1947
  • Folder 3 - Project # 470,131: Streaked Dyed Yarn, 1947
  • Folder 4 - Project # 470,430: Hat Chin Strap Yarn, 1947
  • Folder 5 - project # 470,520: Machine settings for Running of Reclaim Mix stocks, 1947
  • Folder 6 - Project # 470,722: Destretching - Dehydrating tire cored, 1947
  • Folder 7 - Project # 470,813: To Improve Adhesion and flex Life cord, 1947
  • Folder 8 - Project # 471,111: Dyeing Cotton, 1947
  • Folder 9 - Project # 480,903: Electric Capst on drying data, 1948
  • Folder 10 - Project # 480,904: Fuse yarn, 1948
  • Folder 11 - Project # 481,018: To duplicate Ruby Yarn, 1948
  • Folder 12 - Project # 481,020: Test for construction, 1948, 1949
  • Folder 13 - Project # 481,201: polished Broom Twine to Improve Appearance, Tensile Value, and Increase Size Pick-Up, 1949, 1950s
  • Folder 14 - Project # 490,202: Treating of Cords and Yarns, 1949
  • Folder 15 - Project # 490,207: Rayon waste rug Filler Yarn, 1949
  • Folder 16 - Project # 490,510: Rayon/Cotton tire Cord, 1949/50
  • Folder 17 - Project # 500,327: Progress report on Use of Morehouse Mill for Breakdown of Pearl Starch, 1950
  • Folder 18 - Project # 501,020: Synthetic fibers, 1950s
  • Folder 19 - Project # 510,209: wetting Out Solutions, 1951
  • Folder 20 - Project # 510,210: Carding, 1951
  • Folder 21 - Project # 510,301: Dyeing cotton Fibers with Napthol colors, 1951/1961
  • Folder 22 - Project # 510,521: Cotton Carding-Effect of the New Card Settlings on Carding Efficiency of Waste Stock, 1952
  • Folder 23 - Project # 511,022: The Dyeing and Laundering Qualities of Egyptian Noils, 1952
  • Folder 24 - Project # 511,218: Scouring "The Effectiveness Saponified Red Oil in the Cleaning of Red Tinted Cotton + Samples, 1952
  • Folder 25 - Project # 540,518: Evaluating fibers and Blends of fibers for the Best End Uses, 1958
  • Folder 26 - Project 3 531,001: 7 1/2 Denier, 19/16, Bemberg Staple, 1954
  • Folder 27 - Project 3 535,536: Bemberg cut Staple Rayon to determine the Processing Characteristics of Bemberg cut Staple Rayon, 1953
  • Folder 28 - Project # 540,301: Synthetic Rug and Chenille Yarn, 1956/1958
  • Folder 29 - Project # 540,302: Soil Resistant Treatments of Raw Stock fibers on both Rayon and Cotton, 1954
  • Folder 30 - Project # 550,107: Phases of Dyeing-Fugitive tints & Sample, 1955
  • Folder 31 - Project # 560,307: Research with Yarn Dyes & Samples, 1956
  • Folder 32 - Project # 610,225: Experiments with Textured Yarns, 1961
  • Folder 33 - Project: Astro Dyeing-cotton skeins & Samples, 1962
  • Folder 34 - Project: Construction Miscellaneous, 1948
  • Folder 35 - Cotton Rug Yarn from Columbus Mill Production, 1962
  • Folder 36 - Dye House Formula & Samples, 1961, 1962
  • Folder 37 - Flame-Proofing Textile Materials 7 Patents & Information, 1954/1955
  • Folder 38 - Introduces New Type of Polypropylene Yarn, 1960s
  • Folder 39 - Kraft paper and Film Construction Report, 1961
  • Folder 40 - Lumar and Lutex Tints Evaluation, 1961
  • Folder 41 - Prevention of Ultra Violet Light degradation of Nylon as Use in Seine Twine, Maitre cord, etc., 1953/1954
  • Folder 42 - Shirley Analyzer Test, 1950s
  • Folder 43 - Soil Resistance, 1950s
  • Folder 44 - Test Done on Nylon, 1906/1961
  • Folder 45 - Testing Vat Pigment Dispersions, 1949/1950
  • Folder 46 - Tuffed Textile Products, 1961
  • Folder 47 - Udine Twine Mills, Inc., Soil burial Tests & Samples, 1950s
  • Folder 48 - Wool Oil Extraction Results, 1960s

Series 3: Receipts for Goods and Services

Box 1 - Receipts for Goods and Services, 1916-1920, 1922

  • Folder 1 – September, 1916
  • Folder 2 – October, 1916
  • Folder 3 – November, 1916
  • Folder 4 – December, 1916
  • Folder 5 – January, 1917
  • Folder 6 – February, 1917
  • Folder 7 – April, 1917
  • Folder 8 – May, 1917
  • Folder 9 – June, 1917
  • Folder 10 – July, 1917
  • Folder 11 – August, 1917
  • Folder 12 – September, 1917
  • Folder 13 – October, 1917
  • Folder 14 – November, 1917
  • Folder 15 – January, 1918
  • Folder 16 – February, 1918
  • Folder 17 – March, 1918
  • Folder 17 – April, 1918
  • Folder 19 – May, 1918
  • Folder 20 – June, 1918
  • Folder 21 – July, 1918
  • Folder 22 – August, 1918
  • Folder 23 – September, 1918
  • Folder 24 – October, 1918
  • Folder 25 – November, 1918
  • Folder 26 – December, 1918
  • Folder 27 – January, 1919
  • Folder 28 – February, 1919
  • Folder 29 – March, 1919
  • Folder 30 – April, 1919
  • Folder 31 – May, 1919
  • Folder 32 – June, 1919
  • Folder 33 – July, 1919
  • Folder 34 – August, 1919
  • Folder 35 – July, 1920
  • Folder 36 – August, 1920
  • Folder 37 – January, 1922
  • Folder 38 – June, 1922
  • Folder 39 – July, 1922
  • Folder 40 – August, 1922
  • Folder 41 – September, 1922
  • Folder 42 – October, 1922
  • Folder 43 – November, 1922
  • Folder 44 – December, 1922

Box 2 - Receipts for Goods and Services 1923-1924

  • Folder 1 – January, 1923
  • Folder 2 – February, 1923
  • Folder 3 – March, 1923
  • Folder 4 – April, 1923
  • Folder 5 – May, 1923
  • Folder 6 – June, 1923
  • Folder 7 – July, 1923
  • Folder 8 – August, 1923
  • Folder 9 – September, 1923
  • Folder 10 – October, 1923
  • Folder 11 – November, 1923
  • Folder 12 – December, 1923
  • Folder 13 – January, 1924
  • Folder 14 – February, 1924
  • Folder 15 – March, 1924
  • Folder 16 – April, 1924

Box 3 – Receipts for Goods and Services May 1924-July, 1925

  • Folder 1 – May, 1924
  • Folder 2 – June, 1924
  • Folder 3 – July, 1924
  • Folder 4 – August, 1924
  • Folder 5 – September, 1924
  • Folder 6 – October, 1924
  • Folder 7 – November, 1924
  • Folder 8 – December, 1924
  • Folder 9 – January, 1924
  • Folder 10 – February, 1924
  • Folder 11 – March, 1924
  • Folder 12 – April, 1924
  • Folder 13 – May, 1924
  • Folder 14 – June, 1924
  • Folder 15 – July, 1924

Box 4 – Receipts for Goods and Services, February-July, 1936

  • Folder 1 – February, 1936 (I)
  • Folder 2 – February, 1936 (II)
  • Folder 3 – February, 1936 (III)
  • Folder 4 – February, 1936 (IV)
  • Folder 5 – February, 1936 (V)
  • Folder 6 – March, 1936 (I)
  • Folder 7 – March, 1936 (II)
  • Folder 8 – March, 1936 (III)
  • Folder 9 – March, 1936 (IV)
  • Folder 10 – April, 1936
  • Folder 11 – May, 1936
  • Folder 12 – June, 1936
  • Folder 13 – July, 1936

Box 5 – Receipts for Goods and Services, November-December, 1938

  • Folder 1 – November, 1938
  • Folder 2 – December, 1938 (I)
  • Folder 3 – December, 1938 (II)
  • Folder 4 – December, 1938 (III)
  • Folder 5 – December, 1938 (IV)
  • Folder 6 – December, 1938 (V)
  • Folder 7 – December, 1938 (VI)
  • Folder 8 – December, 1938 (VII)
  • Folder 9 – December, 1938 (VIII)
  • Folder 10 – December, 1938 (IX)
  • Folder 11 – December, 1938 (X)

Box 6 - Receipts for Goods and Services 1939

  • Folder 1 – January, 1939 (I)
  • Folder 2 – January, 1939 (II)
  • Folder 3 – January, 1939 (III)
  • Folder 4 – January, 1939 (IV)
  • Folder 5 – January, 1939 (V)
  • Folder 6 – January, 1939 (VI)
  • Folder 7 – January, 1939 (VII)
  • Folder 8 – February, 1939
  • Folder 9 -- M
  • Box 2
  • Box 3
  • Box 4
  • Box 5
  • Box 6
  • Box 7
  • Box 8
  • Receipts for Goods and Services 1940
    • Box 1
      • January 2 – January 19
    • Box 2
      • January 19 – January 31
    • Box 3
      • February 1 – February 12
    • Box 4
      • February 13 – February 29
    • Box 5 
      • March 1 – March 31
    • Box 6 
      • April 2 – April 30
    • Box 7 
      • May 2 – May 31
    • Box 8
      • June 1 – June 18
    • Box 9
      • June 19 – June 29
    • Box 10
      • July 1 – July 16
    • Box 11
      • July 17 – July 31
    • Box 12
      • August 1 – August 10 II
    • Box 13 
      • August 10 III – August 19
    • Box 14
      • August 20 – August 21 VI
    • Box 15
      • August 22 – August 31 III
    • Box 16
      • September 1 – September 20 III
    • Box 17 
      • September 20 V – September 30
    • Box 18
      • October 1 – October 11 V
    • Box 19 
      • October 12 – October 19 V
    • Box 20
      • October 21 – October 31 IV
    • Box 21
      • November 1- November 11 V
    • Box 22
      • November 11 VI – November 320 V
    • Box 23
      • November 21 II – November 30 IV
    • Box 24
      • December 2 – December 10 VII
    • Box 25
      • December 11 – December 20 V
    • Box 26
      • December 20 VI – December 31 III
  • Receipts for Goods and Services 1941
    • Box 1
    • Box 2
    • Box 3
    • Box 4
    • Box 5
    • Box 6
    • Box 7
    • Box 8
    • Box 9
    • Box 10
    • Box 11
    • Box 12
    • Box 13
    • Box 14
    • Box 15
    • Box 16
    • Box 17
    • Box 18
    • Box 19
    • Box 20
    • Box 21
    • Box 22
    • Box 23
    • Box 24
    • Box 25
    • Box 26
    • Box 27
    • Box 28
    • Box 29
    • Box 30
    • Box 31
  • Receipts for Goods and Services 1942
    • Box 1
    • Box 2
    • Box 3
    • Box 4
    • Box 5
    • Box 6
    • Box 7
    • Box 8
    • Box 9
    • Box 10
    • Box 11
    • Box 12
  • Receipts for Goods and Services 1943
    • Box 1
    • Box 2
    • Box 3
    • Box 4
    • Box 5
    • Box 6
    • Box 7
    • Box 8
    • Box 9
    • Box 10
    • Box 11
    • Box 12
    • Box 13
    • Box 14
    • Box 15
  • Receipts for Goods and Services 1944
    • Box 1
    • Box 2
    • Box 3
    • Box 4
    • Box 5
  • Receipts for Goods and Services 1945
    • Box 1
    • Box 2
    • Box 3
    • Box 4
    • Box 5
    • Box 6
  • Receipts for Goods and Services 1947
    • Box 1
    • Box 2
    • Box 3
    • Box 4
  • Receipts for Goods and Services 1948
    • Box 1
    • Box 2
    • Box 3
    • Box 4
    • Box 5
    • Box 6
    • Box 7
    • Box 8
    • Box 9
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